Reviews

Music for the children of our time

The Edukators

The angry man of sculpture

Attack on artistic freedom in Russia

Pushing at the edges

The secret life of objects

Porcelain that challenged the world

Bill Brandt

Heaven on Earth: Art from Islamic Lands

Unscene

The inspiration of Italian cinema

Democracy

Pissarro in London

Of Villains and Villeins

Piazzas on the eve of destruction

Modernism resurgent

Wilkie - Painter of everyday life

Techno-gothic fusion

Americans

Gagarin Way

Hyperlynx

Vietnam behind the lines

Romney - mirroring the gentry

Caspar David Friedrich - the essential Romantic

The awesome effects of the sublime

Earth & fire

Paul Klee: The nature of creation

John Pilger's Great Eyewitness Photographers

Sarah Medway: In the Realm of the Senses

A glimpse of the Hermitage

Vermeer at the National Gallery

Paul Signac: Travels in France

The other story of British abstract art

Breaking the silence

Century City

Digitising the Hermitage

Ghosts of christmas past

The disasters of war

Picturing the people's game

Picasso as political icon

An art world Schindler

British modernism reclaimed

Brush Power

The modern bronze age

The first museum of modern art

Six women who shook the world

Frances Aviva Blane

Caro's challenge

Ellsworth Kelly at the Tate

Magnum resists the lure of the dollar

Rebel behind the American movement

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Ghosts of christmas past

London's Clerkenwell is now London's most fashionable district as 19th century commercial buildings are being reconstructed into fashionable eateries, flats and offices. The Dickensian feel of Victorian buildings like the Clock Building of 1893 in St John's Street, part of the Allied Brewery complex, may disappear by the end of this decade as London EC is modernised "from within". Its future is uncertain at this moment. However, planning permission for the over 70,000m of floor space, presently used as a car park, has been given by Islington council.

But just now three women artists* have put drama and emotional drive into a semi-derelict old Brewery in London's Clerkenwell, thanks to the imaginative drive of their curator Angela Diamandidou. The entire building has turned into an art work, which embraces cityscapes seen through the windows.

The paintings, sculpture and mixed media works are enhanced by the traces of time which reside in the spaces. The fact that the building may be up for demolition gives the installation a heightened poignancy and symbolic meaning.

Probably the best contemporary show this December for anyone interested in the city of London, architecture, painting or sculpture.

* Frances Aviva Blane, Sheila Gaffney, Helen Sear

"Before now.... and after" is at 148 St John Street, London EC1 until December 22, open Wednesday - Saturday 12 noon - 6pm. Admission free.

Gaffney, Sear and Blane are also exhibiting in Almstadtstrasse in Berlin's Mitte district, another inner-city area undergoing transformation.